Private Clarence Molyneux, NZEF Shell Shock

WW1 Group of 2 Medals

This is an interesting group, considering the drastic effect of shell shock upon Molyneux in his short period with the unit.

This group is accompanied by digital scan of Molyneux’s service records, and a digital copy of a newspaper article detailing his death.

$ 300.00 AUD

1 in stock

Description

Clarence Molyneux was a Cook prior to WW1, working for the NZ Postal and Telegraph Dept. He lists his wife as next of kin, living in Windsor, England, where Clarence was born.

He started his service on the 27th of June 1916 as part of E Coy 18th New Zealand Rifle Brigade Reinforcements and proceeded overseas to reach Sling Camp in the UK on the 29th of Dec 1916. He then joined the reserve battalion of the Wellington Infantry Regiment.
On the 1st of March 1917, Clarence proceeded overseas to France and on the 9th of June 1917 he joined 9th Coy of the 1st Battalion, Wellington Infantry Regiment in the field.
Something happened to Clarence the day he joined his unit.  Initially his file reads that he is reported missing in the field. Then, once “found”, he is evacuated out of the line. First to no.9 Australian Field Ambulance on the 13th of June 1917 due to exhaustion, eventually reaching the 4th Static Hospital with Shell Shock. Molyneux never returned to the front, being labelled unfit on the 4th of September, and was discharged from the New Zealand Army on the 30th of April 1918, apparently due to wounds received in action.

Molyneux was killed on the 7th of December 1929 near Kaikohe, when the motorcycle he was driving flipped. The passenger was thrown clear, however the side car landed on to of Molyneux and killed him instantly.

This is an interesting group, considering the drastic effect of shell shock upon Molyneux in his short period with the unit.

This group is accompanied by digital scan of Molyneux’s service records, and a digital copy of a newspaper article detailing his death.

Technical Specifications

When received the Defence and War medals were blue as a result of cleaning fluid residue and have been cleaned to remove the offending chemical which caused skin irritation when touched and smelt horrid.