Gunner Peter Jackson Naude, South African Artillery & Engineers

WW2 Group of 6 Medals

This group is accompanied by Naude’s medal issue certificate, and scanned copies of his Conduct sheets, service papers, Attestation papers, Trade test certificates, Medal application, and Service cards. He is entitled to an 8th Army clasp which unfortunately has been lost, or as was the commonly the case with South African groups, never issued.

$ 265.00 AUD

1 in stock

Description

Peter Jacobus (Jackson) Naude was born in 1905 and was a boilermaker working at the Toongatt Sugar Company, a prior to joining the South African Army, leaving behind his wife and for service with the South African Artillery. Naude also interesting had 4 years of service with the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve.

Naude was initially posted as a gunner to the 11th Battery, 4th Light Brigade of the South African Artillery, before being assigned B battery, 2nd Anti-Tank Regiment of the South African Artillery, being transferred to Egypt as a result. Naude also came down with Influenza in July 1940, spending some time in hospital. Naude on arrival in Egypt was transferred over to the SAEC, likely due to their high demand for skilled tradesmen. He was assessed as qualified in 1943, and re-instated as a boilermaker within the SAEC. Naude remained with the SAEC, serving through North Africa and Italy, entitling him to his impressive 6 medal entitlement.

Naude was discharged with benefits on the 17th of June 1945 after serving 5 years and 71 days. He placed his application for his medals on the 31st of March 1947, however his medal issue certificate indicates he was deceased, which is very strange. He did spend several stints in hospital however, so he may have potentially been in poor health and died before the medals were received.

This group is accompanied by Naude’s medal issue certificate, and scanned copies of his Conduct sheets, service papers, Attestation papers, Trade test certificates, Medal application, and Service cards. He is entitled to an 8th Army clasp which unfortunately has been lost, or as was the commonly the case with South African groups, never issued.