Trooper Immanual Masters, Southern Rhodesian Armoured Car Regiment & Signalman South African Corps of Signals

Immanual Masters, born on the 25th of April 1920, was an apprentice miner from Gatooma Southern Rhodesia before the war, attesting for service with Southern Rhodesian Armoured Car Regiment. It is unsure how long he was with the unit, only that in December 1942 he was transferred over the South Africa Transport Corps, before being re-mustered as a signaler and serving with the South African Corps of Signals. He was made Artificer/ Wireless operator whist with the unit. In June 1943 he is listed off strength with 14th Motor Brigade Signals Squadron and was transferred to 8th Army Signals. In January 1944 he was admitted to hospital. He was attached to UK forces.

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Description

Immanual Masters, born on the 25th of April 1920, was an apprentice miner from Gatooma Southern Rhodesia before the war, attesting for service with Southern Rhodesian Armoured Car Regiment. It is unsure how long he was with the unit, only that in December 1942 he was transferred over the South Africa Transport Corps, before being re-mustered as a signaler and serving with the South African Corps of Signals. He was made Artificer/ Wireless operator whist with the unit.

In January 1943 Masters disembarked Suez and in February he was placed on strength with Armoured TG as a B class Artisan (Wireless T Operator). In March he transferred from South African Tank Corps to South African Corps of Signals, and in May he was re-mustered as B class Artisan (Wireless T Operator) and posted to the SA Base Depot. In June 1943 he is listed off strength with 14th Motor Brigade Signals Squadron and was transferred to 8th Army Signals. In January 1944 he was admitted to hospital. He was attached to UK forces. He was promoted to T/L/Cpl. in August 1944, and later reverted back to signalman at his own request. He was then re-mustered as a Wireless & Line Operator Artisan, and in April 1945 and September 1945 he embarked Suez for the Union.

This group is accompanied by photographed copies of Masters’ South African service records.